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Babies whose mothers had received support to breastfeed exclusively for a sustained period from birth have a 54 per cent lower risk of eczema at the age of 16, a new study shows.

The Centre for Appearance Research at UWE Bristol has partnered with educational games specialists Focus Games Ltd to launch an exciting new resource to help children understand and respect the differences in people’s appearance.

Around 1,000 children are born with cleft lip and/or palate in the UK each year, with many children requiring long-term multi-disciplinary care.

Developed in maternity units across the West of England, the ‘PReCePT’ project has been selected by the Health Foundation to be part of an ambitious £3.5 million improvement programme.

Cooling babies deprived of oxygen at birth (perinatal asphyxia) can reduce the number of children who develop epilepsy later in childhood, according to a new study published in the journal Epilepsia.

Researchers at the Universities of Bristol, Nottingham and Southampton have been awarded £1.4 million by the NIHR Health Technology Assessment Programme to discover which is the best emollient (moisturiser) for treating childhood eczema.

The first trial of The Lightning Process® has published its results. It looked at the effectiveness of LP in addition to specialist medical care was compared to specialist medical care alone in children with mild or moderate chronic fatigue syndrome.

Children with greater access to fast food outlets are more likely to gain weight compared to those living further away, new research suggests. Academics from UWE Bristol tracked the weight of more than 1,500 primary school children in South Gloucestershi...

New research from the University of Bristol shows that playing outside, aided by regular road closures, helps to increase children’s physical activity.

A project to explore whether brain injuries in children could be prevented through examining and understanding local cases has been awarded £10,000 by the NIHR Brain Injury Healthcare Technology Cooperative. The project is being led by CIPIC HIT.

As part of a joint project with Playing Out and Knightstone Housing, children from Room 13 Hareclive in Hartcliffe, South Bristol, are calling for safer streets from speeding traffic so they can play out more where they live.

Helen Malson and Hugh Herzig, Directors of the Eating Disorders Health Integration Team (EDHIT), reflect on the team's work and achievements over the last year, including an art exhibition of work by people with experience of eating disorders.

Dr Jonathan Evans and Inge Shepherd, Directors of the Improving Perinatal Mental Health Health Integration Team, give an update on progress in 2016-17, including the successful application for a new specialist community perinatal mental health service.

How parents and clinicians make life or death medical decisions involving very young children is the focus of a new study published in the Archives of Disease in Childhood. The findings may offer insight into how the ‘best interests’ of a child are decid...

Dr Patricia Lucas and Dr Jo Williams, Directors of the Bristol Network for Equality in Early Years Health and Wellbeing (BoNEE), look back on 2016-17. BoNEE aims to tackle the health inequalities that result from poverty and disadvantage.

Professor Adam Finn, Dr Julie Yates and Dr Marion Roderick, Directors of the Bristol Immunisation Group Health Integration Team (BIG HIT) update on progress in 2016-17. BIG HIT aims to improve local performance of national immunisation programmes.

Dr Julie Mytton, Director of the Child Injury (CIPIC) Health Integration Team gives an update of the HIT's activities in 2016-17. CIPIC aims to support the commissioning and delivery of activities to reduce injuries, and their consequences, in children.

An update on the work of the Respiratory Infections Health Integration Team during 2016-17 from Professor Alastair Hay. The team has been working to improve advice and support for parents and patients and to reduce antibiotic use since December 2012.

There is an age-related decline in children’s physical activity levels as they progress through primary school, according to a British Heart Foundation-funded study.

Young people with autism spectrum conditions (ASC) have difficulties recognising and distinguishing between different facial expressions, according to research from one of the largest studies to look at emotion recognition in children and adolescents wit...

Fifteen students from Redland Green School's post 16 centre presented their research findings to a group of senior health researchers on Wednesday 22 March. This was the culmination of two terms' work during which the students explored the world of healt...

Estimates suggest that 40 per cent of eczema flares are treated with topical antibiotics, but findings from a study involving academics from the University of Bristol’s Centre for Academic Primary Care, suggest there is no meaningful benefit from the use...

About a quarter of girls in care have low well-being and feel the stigma of care more deeply than do boys according to a new study, announced today, which set out to understand what well-being means to looked after children.

Services for children who are exposed to domestic violence and abuse are vital, but NIHR-funded researchers have found that there is little evidence for what support works best.

The cultural and societal barriers that Somali families with children with autism experience are explored in a paper published in the Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders. The NIHR-funded research team, made up of University of Bristol and...

Over 700 children and young people are to take part in the largest clinical trial ever undertaken in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS), which affects up to two per cent of young people, most of whom do not have access to treatment.

Although doctors and nurses are becoming more aware of patients experiencing domestic violence, the needs of children are often ignored, according to new research published today that reveals a lack of training about how to identify and support children...

There is no word for ‘autism’ in the Somali language, but research suggests that children whose parents have migrated from Somalia to western countries, including the UK, may be at greater risk of developing autism than children from other groups.

Updated advice on how to work with parents who have learning difficulties has been issued by the Working Together with Parents Network (WPTN), led by the University of Bristol.

Genetic differences could help to explain why some babies are born bigger or smaller than others, according to new research from the Early Growth Genetics (EGG) Consortium, an international collaboration of researchers including experts from the Universit...

Sex and relationship education (SRE) is in need of an overhaul, according to research by the University of Bristol. The wide-ranging study looked at how young people in 10 countries viewed their school-based SRE. It found schools appear reluctant to ackn...

Researchers have developed a technique that will help GPs identify which children with coughs and respiratory tract infections (RTIs) are most at risk of future hospitalisation.

After a three-year study involving more than 7,000 children, researchers have developed a technique to help GPs and nurses to decide from which children a urine sample should be collected if they suspect a urinary tract infection is present.

A project led by the University of Bristol, which helps professionals better support parents with learning disabilities, will continue and expand thanks to funding from the Esmée Fairbairn Foundation.

Young girls reported heightened body dissatisfaction after playing a children’s internet game for just 10 minutes, a study has found. Primary school children expressed a more pronounced desire for a slimmer figure immediately after playing a free game wh...

Researchers at the University of Bristol are looking for pregnant women to take part in a study into preventing babies developing eczema. Barrier Enhancement for Eczema Prevention (BEEP), aims to recruit 1,300 babies.

Researchers from the University of Bristol have contributed to the development of a radical new approach to supporting parents with learning disabilities.

More than 750 pupils from 11 local state secondary schools will take part in the annual Bristol Festival of School Sport this week. The event is made possible by the enthusiastic support from around 125 student volunteers.

An update on the work of the Respiratory Infections Health Integration Team during 2015-16 from Professor Alastair Hay.

Dr Jonathan Evans and Inge Shepherd, Directors of the Improving Perinatal Mental Health Health Integration Team (IMPROVE HIT), give an update on progress in 2015-16.

Dr Patricia Lucas and Dr Jo Williams, Directors of the Early Years Health and Wellbeing Health Integration Team (BoNEE HIT), give an update on the HIT's progress in 2015-16.

Lottie, Rachael and Milly are part of the Bristol Young Persons Advisory Group (YPAG). Here they talk about what happens when the group meets.

Bristol’s new mayor is joining young people, key organisations, professionals and community figures from across Bristol to renew calls for a zero tolerance approach to Female Genital Mutilation (FGM).

The risk of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) appears to increase when infants are swaddled while sleeping on their stomachs or sides, new research has found.

Professor Adam Finn, Dr Julie Yates and Dr Marion Roderick, Directors of the Bristol Immunisation Group Health Integration Team (HIT) give an update on the HIT's progress in 2015-16.

Dr Julie Mytton, Director of the Child Injury Health Integration Team (CIPIC HIT) gives an update of the HIT's activities in 2015-16.

A larger placenta during pregnancy could lead to larger bones in the children, a new study has shown. Researchers from the University of Southampton, studied 518 children in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children.

Today is the first World Maternal Mental Health Day organised by the Maternal Mental Health Alliance. One in five mothers experience depression or anxiety during pregnancy, birth and the early months of their child's life, but women don’t have to suffer...

Dr Julie Mytton, Director of the Child Injury Health Integration Team (CIPIC HIT), talks about the team's 2016 conference which took place on 17 March.

In the largest study of its kind to date, researchers have confirmed that high levels of family stress in early life can cause children to wet the bed for prolonged and persistent periods of time.

Being overweight or obese in pregnancy causes babies to be born larger, according to new research, led by the universities of Bristol and Exeter. The study also found that having higher blood glucose (sugar) during pregnancy causes babies to be born larg...

Bristol’s health and care community are showing their support for the city’s 20mph speed limits as the council debates the issue today (15 March). A public petition supporting the speed limits, which received more than 4,100 signatures from people in Bri...

Videos and other resources to help GPs and parents manage coughs and respiratory tract infections (RTIs) have been launched by the University of Bristol's Centre for Academic Primary Care (CAPC) at an antimicrobial stewardship event on 26 February in Lon...

Research has found pre-school children whose parents considered them to be ‘picky eaters’ ate less dietary fibre, and were 30 per cent more likely to be constipated than those who were ‘never choosy’.

University of Bristol researchers led by Professor Alastair Hay are inviting Bristol families to take part in a new study to find out more about how parents manage children’s coughs, colds, sore throats and ear infections in the community.

While the sexual abuse of children is currently an issue at the forefront of public life, concern has focused on the protection of children and the identification of perpetrators. However, a new study by the Universities of Bristol and Durham for the NSP...

The national NIHR Clinical Research Network is hosting a tweet chat on Thursday 18 February between 7-8pm, on young people's mental health and research.

Researchers have provided new evidence that developing asthma can be linked to pregnant women and infants being exposed to paracetamol; by testing that the association was not simply due to the medical complaint for which the person is taking paracetamol...

St Michael's Hospital maternity services at University Hospitals Bristol NHS Foundation Trust have been ranked top in the country in the Care Quality Commission (CQC) maternity survey 2015.

An emotional resilience (ER) programme launched recently at the University of the West of England that is helping students to develop ‘mental wealth’ is going from strength to strength. Students are being trained in helping others to deal with ER skills...

New mothers with learning difficulties have benefitted from a pilot programme that helped them learn to care for and interact with their babies, an evaluation by University of Bristol experts has found.

Mike Bell, our Patient and Public Involvement Facilitator, describes the work of the Bristol Young Persons Advisory Group (YPAG) which comprises young people aged between 10 and 17 who are interested in healthcare and research.

The new Children's Focused Nursing Simulation Suite at the Glenside Campus of the University of the West of England was officially opened by Kath Evans, Experience of Care Lead – Maternity, Newborn, Children and Young People for NHS England on Tuesday 8...

Reducing toddlers’ portion sizes or number of eating occasions could potentially help to target weight gain in later life, according to new research from the University of Bristol and University College London (UCL).

New research by academics from the University of Bristol has found women exposed to passive smoking, on average, deliver their babies earlier and with lower birth weights compared to unexposed women.

Researchers at the University of Bristol have received £1.5 million from the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) for a trial looking at easing the pain of ear infections. This is part of a larger investment of over £15.8 million into research t...

New research from Children of the 90s shows that the weight gain of infants given cow’s milk as a main drink in place of breast or formula milk before 12 months of age may be greater than that of breastfed infants.

Dr Suzanne Audrey, co-director of SHINE HIT, is encouraging everyone to get behind an online petition in favour of keeping and extending 20mph speed limits in Bristol.

A study led by the University of Bristol, in collaboration with University of Central Lancashire, found many GPs and practice nurses are uncertain how to manage consultations involving children exposed to domestic violence.

A major new consultation on the future of children’s community health services in the region is running from 3 September and will end on 25 November 2015.

Mothers who took part in a study about preschool children’s physical activity and sedentary behaviour do not feel that the government targets are relevant to their preschooler.

Young people who identify with the goth subculture might be at increased risk of depression and self-harm, according to new research led by academics at the Universities of Oxford and Bristol, published in The Lancet Psychiatry journal.

ALSPAC, or Children of the 90s, has been charting the health of 14,500 families in the Bristol area since the early 1990s in order to improve the health of future generations. ALSPAC is a world-leading birth cohort study.

Pupils from May Park Primary School have been recognised for their good work making sun safety a priority in school and raising awareness about the dangers of UV exposure ahead of the summer holidays.

Parents across Bristol are being encouraged to teach their children how to use garden trampolines safely in order to enjoy an injury free summer. Avonsafe Bristol, the local injury prevention organisation, has commissioned the campaign and teamed up with...

Dr Jonathan Evans and Inge Shepherd, Directors of the Improving Perinatal Mental Health (IMPROVE) Health Integration Team, give an update on progress in 2014-15.

Dr Patricia Lucas and Dr Jo Williams, Directors of the Early Years Health and Wellbeing Health Integration Team (BoNEE HIT), give an update on the HIT's progress in 2014-15.

Measuring the size of a child's head is done routinely worldwide to screen for possible learning or developmental problems but new research suggests that differences within the normal range of measurements are common - and mainly due to human error - and...

Professor Adam Finn, Dr Julie Yates and Dr Marion Roderick, Directors of the Bristol Immunisation Group Health Integration Team (HIT) give an update on the HIT's progress in 2014-15.

The winners of this year’s Bristol Healthy School Awards were announced at a special gala dinner on Saturday 9 May. Hundreds of pupils from schools across the city applied to this year’s awards, with hopefuls competing to become the Young Chef, Baker or...

Dr Julie Mytton, Director of the Child Injury Health Integration Team (CIPIC HIT) gives an update of the HIT's activities in 2014-15.

It’s a common dilemma faced by many working parents: your child has a cough or a cold, do you send them to nursery? Researchers from the University of Bristol have, for the first time, investigated the process of decision-making that parents go through w...

Accurately predicting the probability of a live birth after in vitro fertilization (IVF) treatment is important for both those undergoing the treatment and their clinicians. Findings from a comparison study that analysed the accuracy of the two most wide...

As part of an ambitious project to help Bristol Royal Hospital for Children (BRHC) cope more effectively with winter pressures, staff developed a wide-ranging ‘flow’ programme to ensure BRHC was as prepared as possible for the extra demand.

The University of the West of England (UWE Bristol) has been chosen as one of seven new sites to develop Patient Centred Outcome Measures (POCMs) by NHS England. The new centres will mean that children and young people will play a more active role in dec...

A group of researchers led by the University of Bristol have received funding for a project that aims to improve the management and treatment of childhood eczema, a common condition that can have a significant impact on quality of life.

Babies who gain weight rapidly in the first three months of life are more likely to develop asthma and for it to persist into adolescence.

Deprivation in Bristol is higher than average for England, with nearly 20,000 children living in poverty. The Bristol Network for Equality in Early Years Health and Wellbeing Health Integration Team (BoNEE HIT) aims to tackle these health inequalities th...

More than 50 people gathered to hear how the Child Injury Prevention and Injury Care (CIPIC) Health Integration Team are working in Bristol to help prevent children's injuries, and to improve outcomes for those children and families affected by injury.

On 6 November the Bristol Network for Early Years Health and Wellbeing HIT officially launches with an exhibition of children's art exploring health.

A new Health Integration Team (HIT) to improve the mental health of parents from conception through to the first year after their child’s birth, has been approved by the Bristol Health Partners Executive Group.

A new project to improve the health of children across Bristol gets underway this month as experts from across the city join forces to tackle the inequalities faced by 20,000 youngsters living in poverty.

Dr Julie Mytton, Director of the Child Injury Health Integration Team (CIPIC HIT) reflects on the team's achievements in 2013-14.

​Dr Patricia Lucas reflects on the Bristol Network for Equality in Early Years Health and Wellbeing (BoNEE) Health Integration Team's first year.

Eight Bristol schools are the first to receive the new Mayor’s Healthy Schools Award, to celebrate schools that consistently demonstrate high standards in helping pupils understand how to improve their health and wellbeing.

The Child Injury Prevention and Injury Care Health Integration Team (CIPIC HIT) is a team of nurses, doctors, practitioners and scientists, working together to reduce the number of unintentional injuries to children across the Bristol area.

A powerful new drug which could relieve the symptoms of devastating childhood disease Rett syndrome is on the horizon thanks to a funding injection of £180,000 for University of Bristol scientists.

The Department of Health has announced that it is working towards introducing a life-saving vaccine for Meningitis B into the childhood immunisation programme.

A new Health Integration Team (HIT) tackling child health inequalities in Bristol has been given the green light by the Bristol Health Partners executive group.

Working parents are often caught between the needs of their sick child and their job, which can lead to continued day care use even when their child is ill.

A research centre which focuses on improving the health and wellbeing of children and is a collaboration between Bristol, Cardiff and Swansea Universities has been awarded £4.3 million funding to continue its work for a further five years.

The Child Injury Health Integration Team (CIPIC HIT) launched on Monday 2 September with a bold statement of intent to position Bristol at the forefront of child injury prevention and care. Julie Mytton, Co-ordinating Director of CIPIC, said during her o...

Cot deaths in the UK have fallen by 80 per cent following groundbreaking research by Peter Fleming, Professor of Infant Health and Developmental Physiology and his team at the University of Bristol.

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