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The 20mph speed limits in residential areas in Bristol have prevented more than four fatal casualties a year, as well as 11 serious and 159 slight injuries, an evaluation by UWE Bristol has found, estimated to have saved the NHS £15 million a year.

2018 marks the 70th anniversary of the NHS. To mark the occasion, we are looking for anyone who has their 70th birthday this year and has participated in health research, who would be willing to share their story with the media.

Five Health Integration Teams (HITs) presented their work aimed at keeping people out of hospital at a special lunchtime seminar on 5 February, to commissioners, project managers, researchers and people from the voluntary sector.

Channel 4’s documentary, Can You Rebuild My Brain? gave an insight into how the pioneering Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) procedure can improve people’s lives, and featured a nurse from MOVE HIT.

The Improving Care in Self-Harm Health Integration Team (also known as STITCH) has been shortlisted in the Hearing the Patient Voice award as part of Health Education England’s Star Awards programme in the South West.

Antibiotic resistance in children’s E. coli, a bacteria that is the most common cause of urinary tract infection, is high against many antibiotics commonly prescribed in primary care and could make them ineffective as first-line treatments, warns a study...

How can people who experience psychosis, those close to them, health professionals, activists and researchers build a new story about psychosis where thriving and resilience are a potential outcome, rather than hopelessness and stigma?...

NIHR CLAHRC West's popular free training programme includes a range of courses for people working in health, public health, research and commissioning, as well as patients and members of the public.

The Eating Disorders Health Integration Team are holding an exhibition of photographs by people with experience of eating disorders on 27 February.

Expecting GPs to use medical records to identify individual patients who are most vulnerable to cold weather is unrealistic, according to a study by researchers at the University of Bristol, UCL and the University of Birmingham.

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