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This event will provide an overview of the status of antibiotic resistance on a local, national and global scale, some of the solutions being explored both within the NHS and beyond, and some of the ways in which you can help yourself and be part of the s

On Wednesday, 4 March 2020, the Drug and Alcohol Health Integration Team (HIT) brought together service providers, service users, researchers and commissioners to discuss how to address prescription opioid dependence in Bristol, North Somerset and South G...

Researchers at the NIHR Health Protection Research Unit in Evaluation of Interventions and NIHR Applied Research Collaboration (ARC) West have found that a new pilot service in South Gloucestershire is helping patients with chronic pain reduce their use o...

University of the West of England (UWE Bristol) researchers are supporting clinicians at the North Bristol NHS Trust to develop a device that can diagnose urinary tract infections (UTI) in a matter of minutes. Current diagnostic testing takes a few days...

Doctors should avoid co-prescribing benzodiazepines to opioid dependent patients who are being treated with methadone or buprenorphine, also known as opioid agonist treatment (OAT), due to a three-fold increase in risk of overdose death, according to a s...

Doctors and nurses often prescribe antibiotics for children with cough and respiratory infection to avoid return visits, symptoms getting worse or hospitalisation.

Full or partial bans on GPs prescribing gluten-free (GF) foods to people with coeliac disease save the NHS money in the short-term. But the impact on patients is unknown, NIHR-funded researchers at the University of Bristol have warned.

The widely adopted practice of issuing 28-day rather than longer duration prescriptions for people with long-term conditions lacks a robust evidence base and should be reconsidered, according to a study published in the British Journal of General Practic...

Antibiotic resistance in children with urinary infections is high and could render some antibiotics ineffective as first-line treatments, warns a study published by The BMJ.

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